Treatment Adherence in Young People with IBD

We are looking to invite young people (aged 13-18) with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and parents of young people with IBD to attend workshops to provide their feedback on a new intervention to support young people with IBD to adhere to their treatment plan. Feedback from these workshops will be used to improve the intervention. 

What we've done so far

We conducted interviews with young people (aged 13-18 years) with IBD, and parents of young people with IBD to understand why young people may not adhere to their IBD treatment plan; and to find out what kinds of support would  help young people to live well with IBD.

We found out about: 

  • How IBD affects a young person’s life and their beliefs about the condition and its treatment,
  • Things that make adherence difficult, and 
  • Beliefs about the most effective strategies to support medication - taking their views on helpful and engaging ways to provide support.

Existing research was also reviewed to identify programmes that have been developed in other places.

What we're planning next

1. Developing an intervention

The information we found out from our previous research projects was combined to identify how we can best support young people to adhere to their treatment plan. This will then be used to assist the researchers in the development of an intervention, specifically tailored for the needs of young people (aged 13-18) with IBD, to improve their treatment adherence behaviours. Such treatment behaviours include, taking medication and following lifestyle advice.

2. Feedback workshops

Following the initial development of the intervention, we are looking to invite young people with IBD and parents of young people with IBD, to separate workshops. Within these workshops, the research team will introduce young people and parents to the intervention, before asking those attending the workshops to provide their feedback on it. 

We will welcome all feedback, including views on the content of the intervention as well as how we plan to deliver the intervention to young people. The workshops are likely to last around an hour. We will also use creative methods, (such as collage or the use of Lego) within the workshops to help young people and parents provide their feedback and generate ideas.

The ideas and feedback provided by young people and parents within these workshops will be used to further develop the intervention to ensure it is appropriate for young people, aged 13-18 years, with IBD.

By Miss Cassandra Screti, Aston University


If you’d like to find out more about how Crohn’s & Colitis UK can support young people and families of people with Crohn’s or Colitis, there’s lots of information on our website.