Employment & IBD: a guide for employers

The majority of people with Crohn's Disease or Ulcerative Colitis (the two maind forms of Inflammatory Bowel Disease - IBD) are of working age when they are diagnosed. This means that they are likely to be concerned about their job and their employment prospects. However, many people with Crohn’s or Colitis want to and are able to work successfully and fulfil their potential. Several studies have shown that people with Crohn's or Colitis give high priority to maintaining their attendance and performance at work.

This information is intended to help employers and managers understand what it means to have Crohn's or Colitis. It also considers the legislation relevant for managing people with such long-term health conditions. 

This information is intended to help employers and managers understand what it means to have Crohn's Disease or Ulcerative Colitis. It also considers the legislation relevant for managing people with such long-term health conditions. It also considers the legislation relevant for managing people with such long-term health conditions. This information sheet also covers the Equality Act 2010 which applies to England, Wales and Scotland. The Act does not apply to Northern Ireland. If you live in Northern Ireland, you may wish to visit nidirect for further information on employment rights. 

What are the symptoms of Crohn's and Colitis?
What Crohn's and Colitis are not...
What causes Crohn's and Colitis?
What can be the effect of treatment?
Does Crohn's or Colitis affect an employee's ability to do their job?
How can employers help?
What are the needs of people with IBD likely to be?
Are Crohn's and Colitis covered by the equality act 2010?
Deciding on reasonable adjustments
Examples of reasonable adjustment for people with IBD
What is the access to work?
What to do if an employee feels that they have been unfairly treated or discriminated against
Managing sickness absence
Return to work after sickness absence
Ongoing support and regular reviews
What happens if sufficient reasonable adjustment cannot be made?
Help and support from Crohn's & Colitis UK
How we write our information

Last reviewed: May 2017